Dr McCrumbles art

Dr Joseph McCrumble is not only the world's first celebrity Parasitologist, but he is also an accomplished artist. Here we are privileged to gain, for the first time, a glimpse into his artistic mind. The Cumbernauld Institute of Art was founded by Dr McCrumble and is one of Scotlands premier exhibition centres for post-modernist existential-abstractism.

Sunday, September 17, 2006

Unfinished business

Unfinished Business (2006)

Dear art-lovers

Another entry for the Autumn Exhibition. This is a piece I started more than a year ago, when I came across a young dead frog that had been half eaten and its remains left by a stream. The sudden discovery prompted a moment or two of empathy and I went home to start this painting. I called it unfinished business because the frog itself had not finished its development and because my own journey, to buy some shrimps from the local village fishmonger (represented by the boat and pink shape in the upper-right corner), had also been interrupted. I picture the moment when the frog meets its demise. We see the tadpole-like ghostly imprint left behind as the blood flows free. The animal itself is hovering on the interface, still tethered to the ground by its mortal remains but no longer a recognisable sentient being. The picture also has a slightly unfinished feel to it, though this is a deliberate feature rather than laziness at work!

Friday, September 15, 2006

Autumn Exhibition

Dear Art Lovers

It's been a while since I was able to put my artistic brain to work. Due to recent troubles, I have had to postpone the planned summer exhibition until the Autumn. Here are three pieces of work I have managed to complete. Each one signifies a step forward in my artistic development. I have provided a short introduction to each piece as an aide to interpretation for those of you unused to my style of representation.

Snakes alive! (2006)

Awaiting the sun to set, I see many visions of where our origins lie. Sometimes, another voice hails me to come forward and experience life from the eyes of another sentient being. Should we be afraid to do this? I think not, for it is only by understanding the limited view of lesser organisms that we can begin to understand our own.

Mother and child (2006)
As you may have heard, my wife is pregnant with our third child. Here, I depict her as a fragile cage, supporting her foetus as they travel down the birth canal together. Danger lurks in front and behind, for pregnancy is never kind. And we call it an everyday miracle?

Riding the cosmic plane (2006)

Here, I depict myself as a traveller without boundaries. A supernova exploding may propel me across many universes but still I remain true to the undying essence of my beliefs. We can never be sure that we will survive such a tumultuous journey, but if we prepare ourselves beforehand, and pray to our own minds that they can fill themselves with fortitude, then maybe fortune will be kind, and after separation we can still find ourselves whole again.